Wording for Catholic Communion Invitations

by Kimberly Dyke
Write a formal invitation for a first Catholic communion.

Write a formal invitation for a first Catholic communion.

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A child's first Catholic communion is a memorable day to share with close friends, family and other congregation members. The communion ceremony is a formal occasion and so the first communion invitation merits wording that is more formally written. Add personal touches to reflect your own style and enjoy the blessings of your special day.

Personal Greeting

Begin your communion invitation with a brief personal greeting. Express how important this first communion is to you and your child, and that you would love to share the memorable day. Use a poem, scripture verse or quotation to make the introduction more personal. Include phrases such as, "This day will be filled with blessings," or, "Please share in this holy sacrament with us."

Inviting the Guest

Explain that the invitation is for a first Catholic communion. Write the first and middle name of the child who will be receiving her first communion. A simple line could read, "Please join us in celebrating the First Holy Communion of Sarah Beth."

Date and Time

Write the day and time of the ceremony in a formal format on the next line. For example, write, "Sunday, the fourteenth of May at one o'clock in the afternoon."

Location

Include the location of the communion ceremony on the following line. Write out the name of the venue, along with the street address, city and state. The ZIP code is not necessary for the invitation. For example, the line will read, "St. Mary's Church, 101 Yancey Drive, Greensboro, North Carolina."

Reception

The final line of the invitation should include the reception information. Include the type of reception, such as a lunch or formal dinner. Write, "Dessert reception to follow, Glassy Mountain Lodge," or, "A celebration dinner will be served." Include the reception venue name if the celebration will take place at a different location.

About the Author

Kimberly Dyke is a Spanish interpreter with a B.A. in language and international trade from Clemson University. She began writing professionally in 2010, specializing in education, parenting and culture. Currently residing in South Carolina, Dyke has received certificates in photography and medical interpretation.

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