How to Tie an Arrowhead on an Arrow

by Ocean Malandra, Demand Media Google

    Primitive bows and arrows used sharpened stone arrowheads that were fastened on the ends of strong arrow shafts by nothing more than strong twine or leather straps. Many of the arrowheads found at archaeological digs were once attached in this way, but have outlasted the tying devices and even the arrow shafts due to their hardy nature. If you are creating a primitive arrow or want to use a found stone arrowhead, tie it onto a sturdy arrow shaft to make a primitive arrow that you can shoot from a bow.

    Step 1

    Cut a 1-inch-deep notch into the top of an arrow shaft. Make sure that it is deep and wide enough for the arrowhead you are working with to fit into. The flaring pegs on the lower part of the arrowhead should stick out of either side of the shaft, as they are what holds the arrowhead in.

    Step 2

    Fit the arrowhead into the notch. Use the knife to carve away any obstructing wood. Shape the ends of the shaft so that they taper into the arrowhead. The forked ends should not be blunt, but flush with the arrowhead.

    Step 3

    Tie a loop and knot around the shaft of the arrow above the point where the arrowhead's pegs stick out; make it snug and tie it off on one side so that there is only one long piece of line left.

    Step 4

    Bring the line down and across the arrow shaft; wrap it under one of the pegs of the arrowhead, bringing it back up and around the other side.

    Step 5

    Continue to loop the fishing line around the arrowhead and arrow, crossing over where the forks of the shaft hold the arrowhead on both sides as you go. The line should cross itself, forming an ¨X¨ shape on each side. After about 15 or 20 passes you should have a tightly bound arrowhead on your arrow shaft. The crosses of line should be thick on both sides.

    Step 6

    Wrap the line around the base of the ¨X¨ that you made. Wrap the line over the ¨X¨ until the wrapping is completely covered. Tie off the line after you have wrapped it around and over the pegs that have been crossed around.

    Step 7

    Burn and melt off the end of the line that you tied off using a lighter; this seals the knot and the wrapping.

    About the Author

    Based in San Francisco, Ocean Malandra is a travel writer, author and documentary filmmaker. He runs a major San Francisco travel website, is widely published in both online and print publications and has contributed to several travel guidebooks to South America.

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