Tactful Ways to Ask for Money for a Retirement Party at Work

by James Stuart

Employees who are retiring will want their retirement party to be perfect. The company will often help pay for this party, but the employee might want to ask the employer just to make sure. When asking about money, it's important to be as tactful as possible to avoid an awkward exchange.

what is a fallback

Be Direct

Being tactful does not mean beating around the bush. An employee should ask to speak privately to his boss, or the person in charge of payroll, and politely ask for the money. He shouldn't make apologies or beg for the money. He should explain that his retirement is coming up soon and that he will need money for it. Then he should ask for the specific amount.

Wait for It to Come Up

If an employee is afraid that being direct about money will make her work situation tense or ruin her relationship with her employer, she should bring it up more casually. She should wait for the topic of her retirement to come up in conversation and then steer the conversation toward the subject of her party, explaining that she will need money to realize her plans. If the conversation was informal, she might need to follow up later.

Be Careful

In many cases the company itself will plan the retirement party, and the employee can simply sit back and enjoy it. This party could be a surprise. So before asking for money, the employee should ask someone he trusts to find out whether a party is already planned.

Everyone Pitches In

If the company does not directly pay for the expenses of the party, a volunteer often collects donations for the party. This volunteer should go around and politely encourage people to pitch in for their colleague's party. If it's a larger company, it can help to remind employees who the retiree is. Tell them about the retiree's contributions to the company, and explain that any amount they can give will help.

About the Author

James Stuart began his professional writing career in 2010. He traveled through Asia, Europe, and North America, and has recently returned from Japan, where he worked as a freelance editor for several English language publications. He looks forward to using his travel experience in his writing. Stuart holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and philosophy from the University of Toronto.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images