Summary of "Witch & Wizard" by James Patterson

by Elizabeth Burns, Demand Media Google

    "Witch & Wizard," by James Patterson and Gabrielle Charbonnet is a novel about two teens whose destiny is to save the world from dark and sinister forces. The young protagonists, Wisty Allgood and her older brother, Whit, embark on a mission to fight a sinister "New Order" that threats life, liberty art and normal teenage pursuits after they are thrown into prison on charges of witchcraft and sorcery. The fate of the teenagers, and the world, hinges on a mysterious prophecy that relates to Wisty and Whit's hidden, but hitherto unknown, powers. Published in 2009, the novel should appeal to teen readers.

    Synopsis

    The book opens with Wisty and Whit being led to their death by public execution. Will the teenagers escape this terrible fate? The reader has to wait and see, because the narrative then flashes back to the night when the children were taken from their beds and thrown into prison. Wisty and Whit, accused of being a witch and a wizard, respectively, soon discover that that thousands of other young people have been kidnapped, while many others remain missing.

    Narrative and Themes

    Wisty and Whit's story is told in the first person narrative by the two protagonists, helping young readers relate to the teenagers. Secrecy is one of the key themes explored in the book. The youngsters' parents know of their magical powers but conceal this knowledge from them, leading the reader to question whether this was to protect them or allow the prophecy to be fulfilled.

    Mission

    Wisty and Whit are on a mission to save the world from tyranny. They discover, to their surprise, that they do have magical powers that equip them to fight the forces of evil and overthrow the sinister new regime.

    Information for Parents

    "Witch & Wizard " contains some scenes of violence, but no gore. Children and teenagers are murdered by adults and people are eaten by sinister creatures. However, the children are positive role models because they believe in themselves and are devoted to their parents and to one another.

    About the Author

    Based in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Elizabeth Burns began writing professionally in 1988. She has worked as a feature writer for various Irish newspapers, including the "Irish News," "Belfast News Letter" and "Sunday Life." Burns has a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from the University of Ulster as well as a Master of Research in arts.

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