How to Sketch a Spider

by Nicole Schmoll, Demand Media

    Spiders are scary, often alarming creatures to humans. However, many spiders are not harmful to humans and actually eat insects that humans consider bothersome. Spiders are arthropods with eight legs and fangs that they use to inject venom into their prey to kill. Called arachnids because of their eight legs, they spin sticky webs that they use to entangle prey and are found on every continent except Antarctica. Sketching a spider is simple and can be done by children and adults.

    Step 1

    Examine pictures of spiders to learn the basics of their anatomy, namely that they have a head, thorax and eight legs, each containing five segments.

    Step 2

    Draw a small circle in the middle of a page of sketch or art book paper. Draw another circle, slightly bigger and just to the left of the first one. Sketch a larger, egg-shaped circle to the left of that to complete the thorax of the spider. Add two small fangs that curve inward slightly and extend out from the smallest circle representing the spider's head.

    Step 3

    Make four lines on either side of the spider's head and body with two long lines extending out and to either side of the spider's head. Make an additional four lines coming out of either side of the middle circle and two coming off the larger, egg-shaped circle that extend out and behind the spider.

    Step 4

    Break each leg into five individual rectangles along the pattern of the lines you drew for legs.

    Step 5

    Shade in the thorax and head. Draw eight small, dark spots on the spider's head just to the left of the fangs to represent the spider's eyes. Lightly shade the sides of the eight legs and add small, short lines on each leg to represent hair.

    About the Author

    Nicole Schmoll is a freelance writer in Omaha, Neb., who has been writing professionally since 2005. Specializing in gardening, religion, communication and marketing, she has been published in "Woodmen Living," the "Journal of Current Issues in Research and Advertising" and various online publications. Schmoll holds a Master of Arts in communication.

    Photo Credits

    • Thinkstock Images/Comstock/Getty Images