How to Make a Pinwheel Quilt Block

by Cara Batema Google
Make a quilt block that imitates the shape of a pinwheel.

Make a quilt block that imitates the shape of a pinwheel.

Polka Dot/Polka Dot/Getty Images

Making quilt blocks is a meticulous process that requires you to be extremely cautious of cutting each piece to the correct size; quilters often spend more time cutting out pieces than they do sewing. Once you have your pieces, continue to work carefully to make sure each finished block is exactly the right size because lopsided blocks will throw off the whole look of the quilt. The pinwheel block quilt is one of the most common styles, and the blocks give the quilter a chance to practice contrasting colors to make a visually interesting quilt.

Items you will need

  • Quilt fabric
  • Rotary cutter
  • Ruler
  • Iron
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Step 1

Cut two squares from contrasting fabrics that measure 5 inches by 5 inches.

Step 2

Put the squares right side together and line up all edges.

Step 3

Stitch around all four sides, leaving a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

Step 4

Cut diagonally from bottom-right to top-left corner and from bottom-left to top-right corner. Use a rotary cutter and ruler to get a smooth, straight edge.

Step 5

Open each square so you see the right side of the fabric. Press with an iron.

Step 6

Arrange the squares in a pinwheel shape. For example, if your contrasting colors are red and blue, look at the 90 degree angles made by the left and bottom side of each square. The top-left square 90 degree angle will be blue, and the bottom-right square angle will be red. Look at the 90 degree angle made by the right and bottom side of the squares. The top-right square angle will be red, and the bottom-left will be blue.

Step 7

Put the right squares on top of the left squares with right sides together. Stitch with 1/4-inch seam allowance. Fold the squares so the top squares match with the bottom squares with right sides together. Stitch with 1/4-inch seam allowance. Open the square and press with an iron.

About the Author

Cara Batema is a musician, teacher and writer who specializes in early childhood, special needs and psychology. Since 2010, Batema has been an active writer in the fields of education, parenting, science and health. She holds a bachelor's degree in music therapy and creative writing.

Photo Credits

  • Polka Dot/Polka Dot/Getty Images