How to Make Paint From Crayons

by Todd Bowerman, Demand Media

    Crayons are traditionally a solid art medium, but with a little creative tampering, you can turn them into multi-colored paints for your children. Painting with crayons creates a completely different look than regular coloring, but is also different from using paints. Crayons-as-paint go on soft and pliable and slowly dry into a hard wax, opening your child's creative options and encouraging a different way of painting. You can make crayons into paint with a few simple household supplies.

    Step 1

    Empty a box of crayons and separate each crayon based on its color. Place the blues with the blues, the greens with the greens, and so on.

    Step 2

    Remove the paper from each of the crayons until they are down to the bare wax.

    Step 3

    Place paper muffin liners into a muffin tin. The liners protect the pan from wax and make cleanup a bit easier after you are done.

    Step 4

    Break the crayons and place them into the slots on the muffin tin, organized by color.

    Step 5

    Preheat your oven to 200 F. While the oven preheats, place a tablecloth over the table and set your warming plate on top of it. Plug the warming plate in and allow it to heat up.

    Step 6

    Stick the muffin tin into the oven and bake until the crayons melt.

    Step 7

    Place a piece of tinfoil on top of the heating plate and set the muffin tin on top of the foil. Monitor the temperature to keep the wax melted and soft.

    Step 8

    Give each child some paper on which to draw and some cotton swabs.

    Step 9

    Have the children dip their cotton swabs into the melted wax and use the wax to paint.

    Tips & Warnings

    • This project poses a burn risk to children that are not aware of the dangers of hot materials. You should supervise this activity at all times and do not include children too young to understand the risk.

    About the Author

    Based primarily in Austin, Texas, Todd Bowerman has been working as a writer since 2004. He has provided numerous independent clients with ghostwriting and SEO copywriting services. Bowerman currently serves as editor-in-chief of Button Masher Online. He studied English at DePaul University.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images