How to Make Your Own Skateboard Deck Game

by Jennifer Dermody

Strap on a helmet and hit the ramps, rails and streets. With a skate deck, the possibilities for excitement are endless. Skateboarding improves balance while offering a way to expend energy and ease stress. Performing stunts like kickflips and manuals requires advanced skills and practice. If you are a beginner mastering the basics of control, and aren't quite ready to cruise down the boardwalk, improve your skills by making your own skateboard deck game.

Items you will need

  • Broom
  • Chalk
  • Cones
  • Stopwatch
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Step 1

Prepare flat ground such as a parking lot or street by sweeping small rocks and debris out of the way. The area should be free of distracting traffic and pedestrians.

Step 2

Draw a 4-foot-wide course on the pavement with chalk. The course should resemble a maze with a starting line, curves and turns, straightaways and a finish line.

Step 3

Place cones throughout the course as obstacles.

Step 4

Begin your routine by navigating the course on your deck. Keep time with a stopwatch to see how quickly you make it to the finish line.

Step 5

Add an array of tricks to the game such as circling around a cone, or skating over a ramp placed on a straightaway. Add additional obstacles as your time and accuracy improve.

Step 6

Invite friends to play the game. Assign a judge to keep track of the fastest time and the most accurate run. Assign points to the best person in each event. The person with the most points in the end is the winner.

Tips & Warnings

  • Maneuvering a skate deck is dangerous. Wear appropriate safety gear including a helmet and pads.

About the Author

Jennifer Dermody started writing in 1992. She has been published in "Running Wild Magazine," "The Green Book" environmental bid journal and local publications in the areas that she has lived all over the world. She is currently a licensed Florida real estate agent. Dermody earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in communications from Regis College in 1993.

Photo Credits

  • Kane Skennar/Digital Vision/Getty Images