How to Make a Kid's Motocross Track

by Elizabeth Sobiski
Budding motocross racers benefit from a home track.

Budding motocross racers benefit from a home track.

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If you are concerned about taking your kids to public motocross tracks, consider making one of your own. While this does require a good bit of open land and either considerate or no neighbors, it is a way to give your kids space to ride. Use the natural terrain to help shape the track, along with an earthmover or two.

Items you will need

  • Dirt bike
  • Tractor with rear blade and front bucket
Step 1

Ride the area planned for a future motocross track. Use the natural terrain to determine how the track flows, as well as potential shapes from its different elements. For instance, if you have a small gully on the property, smooth out the sides a bit for easier riding. This will make a small jump on the far side, as well as adding a water feature after a rain.

Step 2

Start clearing the track with the blade end of the tractor. The track should be at least 10 feet wide for a single rider, and 20 feet for two riders, for the times they are side-by-side.

Step 3

Use dirt from leveling and clearing the track to make berms. Use berms in corners for both help with turning and for preventing erosion and track ruts.

Step 4

Keep jumps small. Kids often think they are invincible and may tackle even the largest jumps at full speed. By keeping the jumps smaller, keep the enthusiasm to a manageable level. Tabletop jumps work better, as they offer a place to land on top if the rider miscalculates the jump.

Step 5

Use the bucket end of the tractor to build a whoop or rhythm section. This is similar to a washboard road, only with larger bumps. The whoops do not have to be large, no more than a foot at the highest point for a kids' track.

Tips & Warnings

  • Watch for trees with low hanging branches. Either prune the branches back or remove the trees. Going off track is bound to happen, so keep hazards, such as larger trees or rocks away from the sides of the track.
  • Ensure the entire track is visible at once from many vantage points. Check with local authorities before starting to build a track. There may be restrictions within in which you must work.

About the Author

Elizabeth Sobiski has been writing professionally since 2005. She provides businesses such as Burdick and Lee Galleries, Clearwater Fishing Charters and Read Finder with custom content to keep their digital and print media fresh, informative and directed to their target audience. Sobiski holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Roosevelt University in Chicago.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Creatas/Getty Images