How to Make Kids Bath Fizzies

by Katharine Godbey

Make bath fizzies with your kids as a fun craft while teaching them about chemistry. The citric acid and baking soda react with one another when put in contact with water. Together they create sodium citrate and carbon dioxide is released. The carbon dioxide makes the water bubbly like a carbonated drink. Children love to watch their bath water fizz and the oils released into the bath water condition their skin.

Items you will need

  • Large glass bowl
  • 1/4-cup citric acid
  • 1/4-cup cornstarch
  • 1/2-cup baking soda
  • Two spoons
  • Small glass bowl
  • 6 tbs. coconut, almond or avocado oil
  • 1/2-tsp. fragrance oil
  • 6 drops of food coloring (optional)
  • Small soap or candy molds
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Step 1

Place the citric acid, cornstarch and baking soda into the large bowl and mix them well using one of the spoons.

Step 2

Pour the oil, fragrance oil and food coloring into the small glass bowl. Stir gently with the second spoon.

Step 3

Add the liquid mixture slowly to the bowl containing the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly until the mixture is wet enough to stick together.

Step 4

Fill the molds with the mixture by scooping it from the bowl with a spoon. Press the mixture into the mold, making sure it is firmly packed. Work with the bath fizzy mixture quickly or it will dry hard in the bowl.

Step 5

Remove the bath fizzies from the molds after drying for three to four days and store them in an air tight container. This helps them dry solid and allows the fragrance oil to cure thoroughly into the dry ingredients.

Tips & Warnings

  • Instead of adding oil to the mixture, mist spray small amounts of witch hazel onto the dry mixture after adding the fragrance and coloring.
  • Use muffin tins, paper cups, or bath bomb molds instead of soap or candy molds.
  • Use cookie molds placed on top of waxed paper to mold the mixture.
  • Wrap bath fizzies into air tight plastic wrap or plastic bags to give away as gifts
  • Be sure to use skin safe fragrance oil. Look for oils made for soap making.

About the Author

Katharine Godbey began freelance writing for blogs and websites in 2007 with a background in curriculum writing and teaching. She studied business at Colorado Technical University. Godbey enjoys writing about many topics including small business, crafts and florals, decorating and health.

Photo Credits

  • Chris Amaral/Digital Vision/Getty Images