How to Make Edging for Knitting

by Sarah Clark
Edging stitches give a knitted piece a neater look.

Edging stitches give a knitted piece a neater look.

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Knitting often looks good regardless of how it is done. Stitch patterns, color work and other techniques create pieces of textured fabric that can be used for decorative and utilitarian purposes. Adding edging as you knit creates neat sides that enhance the appearance of your work and make it look more professional. Edging also sometimes makes it easier to join knitted sections. Choose an edging style that best suits the needs of your project.

Items you will need

  • Knitting needles
  • Yarn
Step 1

Create a single chain edging by starting with the right side of your knitting project. Slip the first stitch of the row as if to knit, work to the end, and then knit the last stitch normally. On the wrong side of the project, slip the first stitch as if to purl, work to the end, and purl the last stitch. Repeat this pattern for the entire piece. This edging is especially useful for stockinette and other stitch patterns that require joining edges or picking up stitches later in the project.

Step 2

Make a single chain edge for garter stitch pieces by holding the yarn to the front of the work at the beginning of each row. Slip the first stitch as it to purl, then bring the yarn behind the work to knit to the end of the row. Repeat this pattern to create a flat, even edging.

Step 3

Form a double chain edge to create a firm and decorative edging. Slip the first stitch of the right side as if to knit, then purl the second stitch. Work to the last two stitches of the row. Purl the first stitch and slip the second stitch knit-wise to finish. On the wrong side, purl the first two stitches of the row, work to the last two stitches, and purl these two stitches to finish. Repeat this pattern for each row.

Step 4

Complete a single garter edging by knitting the first and last stitch of each row of your work. This firm border is a good choice for stockinette and other stitch patterns that often have loose normal edges.

Step 5

Incorporate a double garter edge to stop stockinette pieces from curling. Slip the first stitch of each row as if to knit, and knit the second row. Work to the last two stitches, then knit these stitches to finish. Repeat this pattern to make an even and notably firm border.

References

About the Author

Sarah Clark has been writing since 1997, with work appearing in Northern Arizona University's "Student Life Organization Newsletter." She holds a B.A. in anthropology with a minor in art history from Northern Arizona University.

Photo Credits

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