How to Make a Daft Punk Helmet Using a Skateboard Helmet

by Jeffery Keilholtz, Demand Media

    Making a Daft Punk headgear out of a skateboard helmet is an artistic way to show your allegiance to the band. In 2002, with the release of their Grammy nominated album, "Discovery," Daft Punk set about making a music video fit with futuristic uniforms and helmets. While the copyright license to the actual design is reserved by the band, you can craft your own helmet with a few household items and a burst of creativity.

    Step 1

    Drill a goaltender's hockey mask to the front of the skateboard helmet with 3/8-inch screws. The mask will add a human-like fact effect, similar to the Daft Punk helmets.

    Step 2

    Wrap a piece of 1/8-inch thick high-density foam around the body of the mask and helmet. Cut the piece to fit and secure to the mask and helmet with permanent epoxy. The foam creates a full-head covering, comparable to Daft Punk models. Trace out and cut small holes in the foam where for eyesight and breathing needs. Use the hockey mask's prefabricated holes as tracing guidelines.

    Step 3

    Cut cardboard pieces to attach to the helmet body. Roll pieces into shallow tubes, for example, and glue them onto the helmet as ear piece extensions. Cardboard cutouts will add body and "futuristic" dimension to the helmet.

    Step 4

    Outline the mask with with painter's tape. Carefully spray black paint within the outlined space. Allow three hours for the paint to lose its tackiness and dry. Paint small bright yellow dots onto the surface of the black mask to act as shining lights.

    Step 5

    Cover the mask with newspaper. Spray the rest of the helmet in fluorescent gold color. Paint over different areas of the helmet with alternative fluorescent colors: orange, blue, green, purple and red, for example. Fluorescent paint glows in black light and adds the final touch to your Daft Punk model. Allow 24 hours to totally dry before using the helmet.

    About the Author

    Jeffery Keilholtz began writing in 2002. He has worked professionally in the humanities and social sciences and is an expert in dramatic arts and professional politics. Keilholtz is published in publications such as Raw Story and Z-Magazine, and also pens political commentary under a pseudonym, Maryann Mann. He holds a dual Associate of Arts in psychology and sociology from Frederick Community College.