How to Make a 3D Moon Model

by Kelly Sundstrom, Demand Media

    When you are teaching children about basic solar system astronomy, make the lesson more exciting and interactive by providing the kids with a hands-on craft that is relates to outer space. For example, construct a 3-D model of the moon using a few basic materials from the craft supply store. This enables the kids to see close up what the real moon might actually appear like in outer space.

    Step 1

    Inflate a large, round balloon, and knot the end.

    Step 2

    Glue 12 wooden craft rings over the surface of the balloon using tacky glue. Space the rings out at least 3 inches apart.

    Step 3

    Pour 3 cups of water into a saucepan, and add in 1 cup paper mache pulp, 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 cup salt. Stir the mixture with a spoon for one minute.

    Step 4

    Heat the mixture over high heat until it boils, then turn the heat down to low. Simmer the mixture for 10 minutes, then allow the mixture to cool for 30 minutes.

    Step 5

    Use scissors to cut newspaper into strips measuring 2-inches wide and 6-inches long each.

    Step 6

    Dip the strips into the paper mache pulp, one at a time, and drape the strips over the balloon form. Cover the balloon form with at least six layers of paper mache strips. Allow the form to dry for six hours. The layers dry as one piece, which reduces the chances of peeling.

    Step 7

    Paint the 3-D moon form using different shades of gray acrylic paint. Allow the paint to dry for 30 minutes before displaying the 3-D moon.

    Tips & Warnings

    • Keep hot paper mache pulp out of the reach of children.

    About the Author

    Kelly Sundstrom is a national special needs spokesperson and writer. She writes content for major brands, magazines and newspapers, including Gather News, STACK Magazine, Colgate, Kudzu, LIVESTRONG and Lowe's Home Improvement. She currently has over 6500 digital and print articles in publication. Her awards include the 2012 Skyword High Flyer Award and the 2009 Demand Media Top Content Creator Award.

    Photo Credits

    • Chad Baker/NASA/Digital Vision/Getty Images