Laser Tag Game Rules

by Crystal Huskey, Demand Media
    Laser tag is a mock battle with harmless lasers instead of bullets.

    Laser tag is a mock battle with harmless lasers instead of bullets.

    Charley Gallay/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

    Laser tag is a mock battle between two teams. Each player carries a laser gun and wears a sensor pack, which alerts you and the enemy when you are hit. The game has many ways in which it can be played, including a variation of Capture the Flag, Free for All -- the most commonly played -- and Survivor. While there are different rules and regulations for each game, there a few basic rules of conduct that must be followed.

    No Contact

    Laser tag is a no-contact sport. If you accidentally bump into somebody, you are both given a warning. If a fight breaks out or you purposely injure or hinder someone, you are immediately disqualified. There is no reason to come close enough to touch anyone in the game, since the lasers reach up to 350 feet.

    Regarding Sensors

    Your sensors should be in full view. These sensors pick up the signal of the opposing team's laser beams and register that you have been hit. The point of the game is to shoot and possibly be shot by lasers, so don't cover up. You also need to keep your sensor's volume up. That's how the enemy knows you have been hit. If your sensor fails, stop shooting at people. Take a timeout and get the sensor repaired. If you knowingly shoot somebody while your sensor is malfunctioning, you will have twice that many points deducted from your score.

    Equipment Failure

    If you brought your own equipment and it is faulty, you are disqualified. The main issue with faulty equipment is generally low battery power. Make sure to check all your equipment before you arrive at the game. If you rented the equipment, take a timeout and get a replacement set.

    Team Sport

    Laser tag is a team sport, so no matter how many points you score, you as an individual do not win or lose. Remember to be a team player. Enjoy the game, but if you find yourself losing your temper or growing tired, take time to cool off.

    Bystanders

    If you have a game of laser tag planned at an outdoor location, it's a good idea to let bystanders know what you are doing. People generally get nervous when they see someone with what looks like a gun sneaking around a public location.

    About the Author

    Based in Atlanta, Crystal Huskey began writing in 2008 for various nonprofit organizations and news agencies. She now serves as the assistant editor for a hyper-local news site. Huskey is completing her Master of Arts in international relations at American Public University.

    Photo Credits

    • Charley Gallay/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images