Kids' Crafts for Homemade Whistles

by Gina Scott

Craft time is a way to bond with your kids. The next time you sit down with your children and talk about what they would like to create, consider making a homemade whistle. Your ears may grow tired of the sound, but your kids will have loads of fun making noise with something they formed with their own hands. Depending on how much time you have, or the age of your children, there are several whistle crafts you can try.

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Straw

One of the simplest homemade whistles you can make with your kids involves only a pair of scissors and a regular drinking straw. Pinch one end flat and cut a triangle shape so that the end of the straw now has a "V" shape. Now, simply blow into the end you cut. As an option, you can punch holes along the body and let your children use their fingers to make different sounds. You and the kids may need to practice a bit to get a whistle out, but ask someone who plays an instrument like a clarinet to give you tips on how to make the sound.

Clay

Take a ball of clay and form a neck on one side. Make sure one side is flat. On the other end of the ball, use your thumb to carve out an opening to look like the end of a whistle, but be sure not to make a hole all the way through the neck. The larger the hole, the deeper the sound. If you want a high-pitched whistle, form a smaller cavity. Make sure the body of the whistle is whole and doesn't have any cracks. Using a pen-like instrument, make a hole just below the neck into the body of the whistle and then another hole through the top of the neck into the body. Let the clay dry and your whistle is ready.

Soda Can

You'll need to help the kids out with this one as it involves using a knife and potentially sharp edges. Using a flat edge, flatten a soda can and cut off the ends so that you're left with only the printed area. Cut to two pieces, about the size and shape of a stick up gum, with one barely shorter than the other. Fold the shorter piece perpendicular around the top piece of the other to form the mouthpiece. Curve the longer piece into a referee-type whistle shape around to come close to meeting the edge of the mouthpiece. Hold your fingers around the edges to help form the sound of the whistle as you blow into the mouth.

Tin Can Lid

Take the lid of any tin can and surround the edges with duct tape so that no one gets cut. Fold the lid exactly in half, leaving about a 1/4 inch gap where the two ends don't quite meet. Drill about a 3mm hole in the top center, about 1/4 inch from the folded edge. To use, hold the folded part of the whistle on the tip of your tongue. Gingerly seal your lips around the rest of the folded edge and blow. It will take some experimenting to get the sound you want, but the kids will love playing with this simple whistle.

About the Author

Based in the Midwest, Gina Scott has been writing professionally since 2008. She has worked in real estate since 2004 and has expertise in pop culture and health-related topics. She has also self-published a book on how to overcome chronic health conditions. Scott holds a Master of Arts in higher-education administration from Ball State University.

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