How to Improve Archery Skills

by Richard Toole, Demand Media

    Whether you enjoy archery simply for target shooting or you are an avid bow hunter, consistency is the key to shooting well. Your skill level will increase as you repeatedly do all of the right things and maintain proper shooting mechanics. How quickly you improve will often depend on how much time and effort you put in on the practice range.

    Step 1

    Maintain proper "T" for when drawing the arrow back. Get into your shooting stance, and draw the arrow back into shooting position. The end of the arrow you hold should be parallel with arrowhead, not be lower or higher. Have a friend stand next to you and make sure you draw the arrow straight back with your shooting arm, forming a sideways T shape.

    Step 2

    Use proper shooting posture. Keep your torso straight, with your eyes looking straight ahead. Do not tilt your head up or down, keep it straight. Your draw arm should be in line with the arrow. Keep your bow arm locked, slightly lower than your draw arm.

    Step 3

    Grip the bow loosely. Keep your bow arm straight and rigid, but hold the bow loosely in your hand. The tighter you hold the bow, the more likely your arm is to shake. Hold the bow as loose as you can while maintaining control over it.

    Step 4

    Stay in your shooting stance after releasing the arrow. Keep the bow in the shooting position until your arrow reaches its target. Maintaining shooting position for this long will help keep you from jerking the bow down as soon as you shoot.

    Step 5

    Aim at the same small spot on the target each time. Pick an particular area of the bull's-eye or animal target that you want to hit. Don't merely shoot at a large part of the target. Visualize hitting the same small area repeatedly, until you can visualize doing it even when you aren't at the range.

    About the Author

    Richard Toole started writing for eHow in 2007 and enjoys writing about a fairly wide range of topics, including sports, hunting, health and fitness, music, and cooking. Toole first got into writing during college at the recommendation of a professor. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in writing from Methodist University.

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