Homemade Christmas Ornaments From Melted Crayons

by Dana Tuffelmire, Demand Media

    Wondering what to do with all of those tiny, broken crayon pieces that can no longer easily be picked up by small fingers? Melt them into Christmas-themed shapes and hang for homemade decorations your kids will look upon with pride. Kids will love to help by engaging in normally forbidden behavior like breaking, shredding or grating crayons. You can even use crayon ornaments again on coloring pages, producing a rainbow of color with each stroke.

    Step 1

    Peel and discard crayon wrappers.

    Step 2

    Break crayons into small pieces, about 1- to 1/2-inches or grate crayons with a grater onto a piece of wax paper. The crayon shavings will melt faster than the crayon pieces, but will produce the same results.

    Step 3

    Place crayons or shavings into molds. Choose a color palette based on personal preferences. Fill molds to within 1/8-inch of the top.

    Step 4

    Preheat oven and bake at 300 degrees for about 10 minutes. To melt the crayons without using an oven, place shavings in small piles between two sheets of waxed paper and press firmly with a warm iron.

    Step 5

    Stir each mold with a skewer or toothpick every 2 to 3 minutes until fully melted. Shavings do not need to be stirred.

    Step 6

    Pull molds from oven and place on a wire rack to cool for about 5 to 10 minutes. Allow the wax to set, but not harden completely.

    Step 7

    Poke holes in the top of each mold with a skewer. Make sure the hole is big enough for the ribbon to fit through.

    Step 8

    Cool completely, then remove molds from trays. If using the waxed paper method, peel the top layer of paper off, remove the wax from the bottom piece and cut into any shape using scissors.

    Step 9

    Cut the ribbon into 6-inch pieces then thread through each hole using a sewing needle to guide it through the hole.

    Step 10

    Tie the ends of the ribbon with a secure knot.

    Tips & Warnings

    • Ensure proper adult supervision during melting and grating phases of the project. Children should never use an oven or iron unattended.

    Resources

    About the Author

    Dana Tuffelmire has been writing for DMS for three years. She taught elementary school for seven years and earned a master’s of education degree with a specialization in literacy. She is currently a stay-at-home mom to two sons. Her dream is to one day write a children's book.

    Photo Credits

    • Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images