Haunted Attractions in Shelbyville, Tennessee

by Ginger Voight, Demand Media Google

    Shelbyville is a town in middle Tennessee that bore witness to the turbulent Civil War era, as well as survived the "Big Storm" of 1830 when a tornado hit the area and killed five people. Like other places in the region, it has its ghost stories and spooky destinations for those in search of proof of the paranormal.

    Southern Hospitality

    In 1835, newlyweds John and Lucretia Eakin moved into the Shelbyville area so that Lucretia, or Crecy, could live closer to her beloved Presbyterian church. They took up residence at 610 North Jefferson St. Over the years she became an active member of her church and community, earning the affectionate nickname "Aunt Crecy." She died in 1892, but loved her home so much that she hung around. She helped the new owners with a sweet and gentle presence that was so courteous she would close a window before it rained. In 1931, a fire broke out in the home, which destroyed Aunt Crecy's old room. Since then sightings have been scarce.

    Spooky Cemeteries

    Hillcrest Cemetery is located at 1802 Madison St., and has more than 300 eternal residents. Cold spots and apparitions have been noted to StrangeUSA (strangeusa.com). About 22 miles to the west of Shelbyville is the community of Lewisburg. The Bethbirei Church on Bethbirei Road just north of Wallace Thompson Road was founded in 1810, with graves in its cemetery dating back that far. The church itself is still active, and some suggest that a few of the former members are as well. In addition to lights that hover around the graveyard, some of the headstones are said to emit a green light after dark. There are also rumors that some graves are possessed. A man-beast has also been reported to stalk the woods in the area.

    Walking Horse Hotel

    Shelbyville is known as the Walking Horse Capital of the World. In nearby Wartrace, nearly 10 miles from Shelbyville, is the Walking Horse Hotel (walkinghorsehotel.com). This hotel was constructed in 1917, and rumors abound about the ghostly beings who linger in its historic walls. In 2007, owner Joe Peters spent three nights on the eerie third floor of his recently purchased hotel, which was enough to change his tune about paranormal activity in his establishment. In October 2010, he opened up the third floor of The Walking Horse Hotel for the first time so that the public could see for themselves -- or not -- what goes bump in the night.

    Regional Haunts and Spooks

    If you're willing to drive a little bit, there are a handful of other haunted locations within a 30-mile radius of Shelbyville. In Manchester, you will find the final resting place of Sadie Baker in Concord Cemetery. It's doubtful, however, that she rested after being buried alive. It was presumed that she was a witch. Nor, apparently, does a long-dead rail worker from Chapel Hill rest after being decapitated by a train. The head was never found, and rumors suggest the light that dances along the railroad tracks in Chapel Hill is the headless ghost in search of that which he lost.

    About the Author

    Ginger Voight is a published author who has been honing her craft since 1981. She has published genre fiction such as the rubenesque romances "Love Plus One" and "Groupie." In 2008 Voight's six-word memoir was included in the "New York Times" bestselling book "Not Quite What I Was Planning." She studied business at the University of Phoenix.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images