Fun Things to Do on a Windy Day

by Sara Clark, Demand Media

    Bright, blustery days can be great fun, especially in the fall. Try wrapping up and walking through woods when the leaves are falling in the wind, and collecting as many different types as you can to take home and identify. Remember that it's supposed to be lucky to catch a falling leaf! There are plenty of other activities that are fun on a windy day, such as making flying objects like paper airplanes, bubbles and kites. Try making a set of paper windmills in different colors and planting them in flowerpots around the yard, flying a wind-up airplane or making and sailing a toy boat.

    Fly a Kite

    Make your own kite from doweling and paper. Take two lengths of doweling, one shorter than the other, and tie them together in a cross shape. Tie string around the edges of the cross to create a diamond shape. Cut a piece of paper that's one inch larger than the diamond and fix it in place by folding and gluing it over the string. Tie a loop of string to the back of the kite, and attach a line for flying it. Add a tail for balance, and tie pieces of ribbon on at intervals. Decorate your kite with crayons or poster paint. To fly it, launch from the top of a hill or run with the kite until you feel the wind start to lift it, then let go, remembering to hold onto the end of the string.

    Bubbles

    Make your own bubble machine and solution. Mix half a cup of dish soap with four cups of water and four tablespoons of glycerin. Make a frame by twisting a piece of wire into a loop with a handle. Dip the frame into the solution and blow gently until the bubble forms and floats away. Try making a giant frame from a wire coat hangar. Cover it in solution and hold it up to the wind until the bubble forms. Try having competitions with friends to see who can produce the biggest bubble or whose bubble floats farthest.

    Windmill

    Make your own windmill to catch those gusts of wind. Take a piece of card, and trim to the shape of a square. Starting from each corner, cut a diagonal line into the center of the card until you nearly reach the middle, leaving an area about one square inch in the center. Make a hole in each corner. Carefully fold the corners into the middle, and push a map pin through the holes and into a length of doweling. The doweling acts as a handle, and allows you to hold the windmill as the wind spins it round.

    Paper Airplane

    Paper airplanes fly much faster and farther in the wind. Take a rectangular piece of paper and fold it exactly in half lengthwise, making a sharp crease in the center. At one end of the paper, fold each corner in until it meets the center crease, making an arrow shape. Fold the edges of the arrow in again until the folds meet the center line. Fold the paper in half again and fold the wings in so that the fuselage is about one inch wide. Decorate your airplane with crayons, and have races and aerobatic competitions with your friends.

    About the Author

    With extensive business experience as a software trainer, Sara Clark became a professional writer in 2010. Her work has been published extensively online and in specialist magazines such as "Gallop." Clark holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Liverpool and a certificate in writing for the periodical press from the National Council for the Training of Journalists.

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