How to Fish With Dead Shrimp

by Colby Stream, Demand Media
    Fishermen normally disconnect the head and tail when fishing with dead shrimp.

    Fishermen normally disconnect the head and tail when fishing with dead shrimp.

    Eising/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Dead shrimp have their uses. While most fishermen consider using live shrimp the best way to bait shrimp, this isn't always the case. Live shrimp work so well because they create movement, attracting the fish. When the waters are muddy and hard for the fish to see, this method doesn't work. During these conditions, using dead shrimp appeals to the fish's nose, enticing it to bite via smell.

    Step 1

    Cut or rip the head and tail off the shrimp. Thread the hook either from the head to the tail or from the tail to the head. Ensure that the shrimp is securely on the hook. Use more than one shrimp if the hook isn't covered as well as you'd like.

    Step 2

    Locate the feeding grounds of the fish you'd like to catch. Dead shrimp are most useful for attracting fish via smell. This means you need to be as close to the fish as possible, virtually putting the shrimp in front of the fish's face.

    Step 3

    Drop your hook and shrimp into the water away from the spot where you think your fish are located. Allow the shrimp to float into the grounds, guiding it with your pole. Once you get to the correct spot, wait for a bite. You'll feel a steady pulling on the pole. Firmly yank the line toward you to set the hook.

    Step 4

    Reel the fish in, being careful not to reel so hard that you snap the line. When you get close enough to shore or your boat, use a net to bring the fish up.

    Tips & Warnings

    • Use a sinker to help the shrimp sink, if necessary.

    About the Author

    Colby Stream has been a writer since 2007. His work has appeared in "The Arbiter," the student newspaper of Boise State University, as well as various websites. Stream graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in communication as a presidential civic leadership scholar.

    Photo Credits

    • Eising/Photodisc/Getty Images