Discount Hotels in Colorado

by Lisa Mercer Google
Discount lodging is available in all parts of Colorado.

Discount lodging is available in all parts of Colorado.

Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images

Colorado tempts outdoor enthusiasts with it mountains and lakes, arts aficionados with its theaters and galleries and gourmets with its upscale restaurants. These activities are expensive, but the Colorado Rocky Mountain high need not mean high hotel prices. In fact, those who know where to look can find rock-bottom hotel rates in all parts of the state.

Denver

Denver always has lured the budget traveler. In the 1950s, the city was a hangout for beatnik writers such as Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. The building of the Eisenhower Tunnel made the ski areas accessible from Denver, and the city became a stopping point for skiers and snowboarders en-route to the mountains. Denver now has an extensive, independent theater scene that attracts actors from out of state. The Rockies Inn on East Evans Avenue has nightly rates averaging about $50, as of November 2010. Budget travelers dance the night away at La Estampidia Night Club, located on the hotel premises. Guests can work out for free at the nearby Andean's Health Club.

Boulder

The Boulder Outlook Hotel and Suites disproves the theory that discount lodging is boring and generic.The hotel, located near the University of Colorado, boats an on-site restaurant that offers vegan and vegetarian options, an on-site blues club, a fitness center and an indoor pool. Rates as of November, 2010 are as low as around $70.

Frisco

Frisco is convenient to all of the Summit County ski areas. The free Summit Stage bus stops on Main Street, right in front of the Snowshoe Motel, whose rates, as of November 2010, start at around $70. The facility has a hot tub and a sauna, and some rooms have kitchenettes. Main Street is the most happening section of Frisco, so the Snowshoe is a party motel, which draws a younger crowd. Visitors hang out at the Backcountry Brewery, but locals prefer the Moose Jaw, with its dive bar ambiance. Frisco also is known for its summer barbecue competition and its annual Corvette Festival. Rates might be even cheaper in summer.

Breckenridge

A stay on Breckenridge mountain offers ski-in/ski-out convenience, but you'll pay dearly for the experience. The town of Breckenridge is faithful to its Victorian mining town heritage. Its lodging options are cheaper and much more interesting than the generic mountain hotels. Breckenridge has The Fireside Inn, housed in a French Street Victorian home. Room rates, which include breakfast, start at around $70. Those on a really tight budget stay in the dormitory, whose rates start at around $30, without breakfast. Like Frisco, Breckenridge also is a summer destination, featuring art shows and living history events. Rates at the Fireside Inn drop during summer.

Aspen

The St. Moritz Lodge and Condominiums in Aspen might sound expensive, but it's not. The St. Moritz Lodge offers an array of accommodation choices, from hostel-style rooms to two-bedroom condominiums with kitchens. Winter rates begin at around $35 for shared hostel space. A two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo sleeps four people. Nightly rates range from a little over $150 to almost $500 during winter, and from a little over $150 to almost $400 during summer. Standard hotel room rates start at about $80 during summer and about $100 in winter. Rates include breakfast, apres ski parties and use of the steam room and hot tub.

Steamboat Springs

Visitors to Steamboat Springs enjoy the local hot springs during summer and the world-class ski resort during winter. A neon sign featuring two rabbit ears is a Steamboat landmark and indicates that you have reached the Rabbit Ears Motel. This iconic budget lodging venue has served Steamboat's visitors since the 1950s. Rates, which include breakfast, range from around $70 to $150. Pets are welcome.

About the Author

My articles have appeared in Aspen Magazine, HerSports, The Professional Skier and other print and online publications. When I'm not teaching fitness or writing, I work at Copper Mountain and at the Breckenridge History Society.

Photo Credits

  • Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images