How to Decorate an Odd-Shaped Game Room

by Erin Schreiner Google

Oddly shaped rooms can present quite the decorating challenge. With this challenge, however, often comes the opportunity to set the space apart through the creative placement of furnishings. If you are preparing to tackle an oddly shaped space and transform it into a fun and functional game room, prepare to engage in careful planning and preparation to ensure that the space meets your needs and preferences.

Items you will need

  • Tape measure
  • Graph paper
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
Step 1

Measure the space. After gathering measurements with a tape measure, sketch out the space on graph paper, making a scaled outline of the room you are preparing to fill.

Step 2

Select the items to fill the space carefully. When you venture to the furniture store or search through your stock of not-currently-in-use furnishings, measure each piece. Look back at your room outline and consider how each piece will fit before you purchase anything.

Step 3

Segment the space. If your game room isn't open and airy, nothing you can do will make it such. Instead of trying to transform the space only to fail, turn it into a collection of smaller segmented spaces. For example, divide your L-shaped game room into two rectangular spaces, dedicating one to pool playing and another to a big-screen television, making the odd placement look almost planned.

Step 4

Create a convenient traffic pattern. Don't segment the space to the point that you disrupt the traffic pattern. Instead, keep it open by ensuring that individuals traveling through the room can get from one side to the other without stepping over furnishings or squeezing through overly tight spaces.

Step 5

Craft conversation areas. Cluster chairs or sofas about the space, creating several small conversation areas in which groups of individuals can engage in conversation, setting your space up as a socialization-ready one.

About the Author

Erin Schreiner is a freelance writer and teacher who holds a bachelor's degree from Bowling Green State University. She has been actively freelancing since 2008. Schreiner previously worked for a London-based freelance firm. Her work appears on eHow, Trails.com and RedEnvelope. She currently teaches writing to middle school students in Ohio and works on her writing craft regularly.