Dancing Cane Magic Trick

by Lena Freund, Demand Media
    The dancing cane trick is a trick involves making a cane dance.

    The dancing cane trick is a trick involves making a cane dance.

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    Magicians earn their keep by making seemingly impossible things happen. Some magicians light themselves or others on fire, others cut people in half and others make objects move on their own. The dancing cane trick is one of these tricks; it requires a magician to make a cane move through thin air. As with any other magic trick, however, the dancing cane trick is a deliberate optical illusion.

    What it is

    The dancing cane magic trick is a stunt in which a magician appears to make a cane dance in midair. The magician usually puts on music and balances the cane in the palm of his hand. Then, the magician lets go of the cane and continues moving his hands through the air; the cane also continues to dance, appearing to be no longer under the magician's control.

    What You'll Need

    All you need for the dancing cane trick is a small cane -- usually black -- made out of a material that is sturdy but easy to cut into. A cane that folds in the middle would be the most convenient because you could then transport it in a bag with the rest of your equipment. You will also need a piece of invisible thread and a pair of scissors. A needle might be required to thread the invisible thread.

    Secret of the Trick

    The key to this trick is a piece of invisible thread. To prepare for this trick, make a small hole in the center of the cane and tie the invisible thread in an inch-long loop around the hole. Insert your middle finger into that thread loop and make the cane move around and around and up and down.

    How to Practice

    Before performing the dancing cane trick for an audience, practice it until you have complete mastery over your cane with its loop of invisible thread. Do regular exercises and light weightlifting sessions to improve the strength in your upper arms, as you will need to keep your forearms steady to keep the cane "dancing" for any impressive period of time. Once you have the cane threaded, practice until your arms are strong enough to keep it going or until you are able to keep the cane dancing rather than smashing into your legs or walls; this requires very small, but controlled, arm movements.

    About the Author

    Based in Washington, D.C., Lena Freund began writing professionally in 2007, while living in Tel Aviv. She holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in Middle Eastern studies and Hispanic studies from the College of William & Mary and a Master of Arts in Middle Eastern history from Tel Aviv University. Freund's articles about travel, languages and cultures have been published on various websites.

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