How to Crochet Colors Together

by M.T. Wroblewski
The anxiety of joining yarn for the first time almost always disappears the moment you succeed at it for the first time.

The anxiety of joining yarn for the first time almost always disappears the moment you succeed at it for the first time.

Ryan McVay/Lifesize/Getty Images

Many beginning crocheters avoid projects that are not monochromatic, as they stress over the inevitability of having to change yarn colors. But think of it this way: unless your project will consume less than one skein of yarn, you will have to "join" an old, dwindling skein with a new, robust one eventually. Although many veteran crocheters keenly remember the anxiety of joining yarn for the first time, they will also tell you that it was a much easier maneuver than they thought. After a few "acts of joinery," you too will be a pro.

Items you will need

  • Yarn
  • Crochet hook
Step 1

Remember that there are only so many ways to connect one piece of yarn with another -- and gluing doesn't count. The goal is that the juncture of connectivity should not be noticeable, meaning that the finished product should exhibit neither a "bump" nor a dangling strand of yarn. The technique you choose to change yarn colors should accomplish this goal but also suit your comfort level and personal preference.

Step 2

Master the "one stitch before the switch" technique. Take the final stitch on the old skein of yarn -- whether it's a single, double or triple crochet stitch -- to the second-to-last yarn-over. Then take the yarn from the new skein and finish the stitch with the new yarn. You have now joined the two yarns together, but tightly double knot the ends by hand to secure the link.

Step 3

Create a slightly stronger link by following the "one stitch before the switch" technique, but do a chain stitch or a single crochet stitch with the new yarn first before finishing the crochet stitch -- be it a single, double or triple crochet stitch.

Step 4

Make a slip stitch and then a tight knot to finish off the old skein of yarn. Leave a tail of about 1 1/2 inches. Make a slip knot with yarn from the new skein and join it to the tail from the old skein with a chain stitch or a single crochet stitch. Continue the pattern as directed.

Step 5

Practice these techniques, but don't become frustrated if you still are left with a short tail at the end of the juncture. This is when your crochet hook will also come in handy, as you can weave in the end to other stitches to create a seamless transition. Given a choice, remember that it's better to have to weave in loose ends with a few chain or single crochet stitches than to cut the yarn too short.

Tips & Warnings

  • If you are purchasing multiple skeins of the same color yarn, check the labels' dye lot number. Ensure that the skeins originate from the same lot for uniformity of color.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Lifesize/Getty Images