How to Cast Silverware

by Steven French

Silverware can be beautiful and unique, especially when it is handcrafted. Most silverware in is mass-produced, but you can cast your own silverware from melted silver to create unique pieces. You can purchase silver to be melted, or you can melt older items -- such as jewelry or old silverware -- down for use in your mold. You can purchase a ceramic crucible for melting at a stone or lapidary shop.

Items you will need

  • Graphite crucible with pouring handle
  • Gas torch
  • Work gloves
  • Silver
  • Wax
  • Knife
  • Small bucket
  • Plaster of Paris
  • Wire cutter
  • Hacksaw
  • Chisel
  • Hammer
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Step 1

Make a model out of wax of the silverware you wish to cast. Whittle the wax with a knife or mold it with your hands while it is warm until you have a complete wax model of the object.

Step 2

Place the model in a bucket that is slightly taller than the model. Hold the model upright while you pour plaster of Paris around it. Fill the bucket plaster until it comes to the very top of the model, but leave a small hole right above the model. Allow the plaster to dry and harden completely.

Step 3

Heat the bucket and plaster mold until the wax model melts completely; then, pour out the melted wax. You now have a mold for your silver piece.

Step 4

Cut the silver into small pieces with a wire cutter or hacksaw to make them easier to melt, then place the pieces in the crucible.

Step 5

Put on work gloves, light the gas torch and apply the flame directly to the silver inside the crucible. Continue applying heat until the silver is completely and evenly melted.

Step 6

Pour the silver into the hole in the top of the mold until the mold is filled. Allow the silver to cool and harden completely.

Step 7

Place the chisel against the plaster of Paris and hit the back of the chisel with a hammer to break the mold and remove the silver item inside.

Tips & Warnings

  • Molten silver is extremely hot. Do not let it come in contact with your skin, as it could burn you.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images