What Is the Book "Drama Queen" by Lara Bergen About?

by Sheryl Faber, Demand Media

    "Drama Queen," a book in Lara Bergen's Candy Apple series, relates the escapades of sixth-grader Charlie, who tries out for the school musical only to find that she's up against the most popular girl in school. The quirky mishaps that get in the way of her stardom are what makes the story realistic and easy for "tween" girls to relate to.

    About the Author

    Lara Bergen is the author of several children's books, including her Sophia Series stories and the Candy Apple series (which includes "Drama Queen"). She has also written Disney and Nickelodeon adventures. Her work includes non-fiction children's books such as "The Travels of Louis and Clark" and "Triceratops." She lives in New York City with her husband and two children.

    The Main Characters

    The main character of "Drama Queen" is Charlie Moore, a musically-talented sixth grader with a wonderful voice. Amber Wiley, also very talented, is the school's most popular girl and lands the coveted lead in the musical. "Robin Hood," the lead actor, is the cutest boy in the school. Charlie's best friend, Nicole, and her little sister, Olivia, are also integral characters in the story.

    Synopsis

    Charlie decides to try out for the school musical "Robin Hood," even though she's stuck babysitting her eccentric little sister and her little sister's imaginary best friend. However, she freezes during the try-outs and runs from the auditions. Her popular rival Amber ends up with the lead and Charlie is given a very small part as a squirrel. Charlie unexpectedly has to play the lead role at the end of the story, due to Amber unexpectedly becoming ill, and surprises everyone, including herself, when she turns in an amazing performance.

    Underlying Theme

    The underlying theme of the story is confidence, something Charlie lacks at the beginning of the book. She has to overcome many obstacles, including caring for an eccentric little sister, putting up with Amber Wiley and her friends, and battling her own insecurities. Young readers can learn from this story by remembering that it's not always talent that wins the competition, but also confidence, courage and the strength to finish strong even when everything seems to be against you.

    References

    About the Author

    Sheryl Faber is a graduate of Minnesota State University. She has had articles published in "True Story" magazine, "Club Management Magazine" and on the websites for San Antonio Weddings and Sante' Foodservice. Faber is also a screenwriter and has movies currently under contract.

    Photo Credits

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