Baby Shower Games for Dads and Moms

by Daniel Alden

Baby showers come in all sizes and themes. While the majority of games are played for guests' enjoyment, there are also games that focus on the new dad and mom and their interaction with each other and fellow parents. These games combine fun and socializing with informative tips that can help the couple raise their future child.

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Little Secrets

For this game, the mom-to-be and dad-to-be need to be in separate rooms. Provide them with a piece of paper and pencil and ask them questions relating to the pregnancy and future child, such as "What traits do you hope your child will inherit from you?" and "What color eyes do you think your child will have?" After each parent finishes, bring them both back out and read the questions out loud, having them guess each others' answers.

Storytelling

Guests are encouraged to share stories about the mom-to-be and dad-to-be, using their knowledge of the parents to describe how they think the child will act. This "roast" should remain friendly and focus on positive traits. Do not encourage insults or topics that can hurt the parents-to-be.

Balloon Diapers

Diapering a baby is an essential skill for new parents. In this game, daddy-to-be and mommy-to-be race each other, seeing who can put a diaper on a balloon first without popping it. You can use a disposable diaper, but the game is more challenging when using a cloth diaper secured with safety pins.

Sharing Experiences

First-time parents have yet to experience raising a child, so they will appreciate advice from fellow parents. Using numbered slips of paper, have guests draw from a large bowl. Have as many slips as there are people present, each with a different number that represents the future child's age. For example, if you have 20 guests, make slips for numbers 1 through 20. After each guest has picked a number, he must write advice to the parents suitable for a child of that age. The advice can be derived from his own parenting experiences or events he recalls from his own childhood. The parents-to-be can choose whether to keep these secret and sealed until the child reaches that age or read them now.

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